PRESS PASS Newsletter

Volume 37, Issue 05, May 2019

A publication of the International Food, Wine & Travel Writers Assoc.
Distributed to IFWTWA Members Only.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 


In this issue...


From the Editorial Desk....

As we head into summer, we’re sending out an abbreviated version of Press Pass, but I wanted to let you know that Press Pass is going on vacation during the months of June, July, and August. We’ll relay vital information if something should arise. Should you have any questions or concerns, please email me: [email protected]fwtwa.org


Writing Tips: Commas

By Chris Cutler

Zoom in of a punctuation mark definition

Commas are probably the hardest skill for writers to master. There are numerous rules concerning their use because commas are not only the most used punctuation mark but also the most misused punctuation mark in English.

I don’t want to bombard you with a bunch of rules, but here are a few tips and examples that might make using them easier for you. If you would like the handout I use in my grammar classes, email me, and I’ll send you one.

• Use commas to separate independent clauses when they
 are joined by any of these seven coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so.

EXAMPLES:

Italy’s cultural identity embraces food, and no city’s existence is more attached to Italian cuisine than Bologna.
NOTE THAT THERE ARE TWO COMPLETE SENTENCES ON EACH SIDE OF THE COMMA AND CONJUNCTION.

I cook some meat but mostly vegetables.
NOTE THAT THERE IS NOT A COMPLETE SENTENCE AFTER THE CONJUNCTION, SO YOU DO NOT NEED THE COMMA.

• Use commas after introductory clauses, phrases, or words that come before the main clause.

EXAMPLES:

While using and eating offal might not sound appetizing to those not familiar with it, offal is the heart of Sicily’s street food.

In every dish, the vegetables win over everything.

Interestingly, this creative man did not start out to be a chef.
NOTE THAT THE COMMAS FOLLOW INTRODUCTORY CLAUSES, PHRASES, WORDS.

Do not use commas to set off essential elements of the sentence, BUT do use them to set off nonessential elements of a sentence.

EXAMPLES:
Essential: The wine that will pair best with red meat is our pinot noir.

NOTE THAT THE ITALICIZED LINE IS ESSENTIAL TO THE MEANING OF THE SENTENCE.

Nonessential: TripAdvisor, which is the world’s largest and most trusted travel website, announced its top fine dining restaurants for 2018 in the Traveler’s Choice Awards.

NOTE THAT THE ITALICIZED SECTION IS NOT ESSENTIAL TO THE MEANING OF THE SENTENCE.

• The biggest tip I can give you if you are unsure of whether to use a comma or not is to read the sentence aloud as you would normally say it, but exaggerate the pause where you think you need a comma. Over 90% of the time, this will give you an indication of whether you need a comma or not.

EXAMPLES:
It is a province rich in nature and rife with reasons to get outdoors.
It is a province rich,   in nature,   and rife with reasons,   to get outdoors.
Would you pause so much if you were saying that sentence, or would you say it in one breath?
 


Conference 2019 News

By Linda Milks

Man playing accordion in Santa Fe Plaza, New Mexico

We're finalizing details for pre & post press trips to include Taos, Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Full conference schedule itinerary will be available on-line soon along with early registration details. 

During the summer months, please watch for emails and website updates at 2019 IFWTWA Conference.


New on the Blog

Exec Chef Chat… on Oceania Cruise Line’s Impressive Marina Ship ~ by Deirdre Michalski

Have you been on a cruise and ever wonder how all of that fine cuisine and afternoon teas are orchestrated? Join Deirdre on just that exploration with an Executive Chef aboard Oceania’s Marina Ship. She will give you a peek behind the kitchen door, and how Chef Alban’s love of cooking was born. She also explores all the 10+ dining venues, specialty restaurants, wine dinner programming and more! 

Grinning waiters giving thumbs up behind a luscious blue martini

The complete article which includes a recipe for Watermelon & Duck Confit Salad from the Red Ginger Restaurant, and a stroll through the many dining experiences aboard Oceania's Marina Ship, first appeared on Tastes & Travel, April 21, 2019. A portion of the article is reprinted here with the author's permission. All rights reserved.

Our Baltic cruise began in Stockholm-Sweden, with stops in Tallinn-Estonia, St. Petersburg-Russia, Helsinki-Finland, Gdansk-Poland, Berlin-Germany, Copenhagen-Denmark, Oslo-Norway and we disembarked in Southampton-England (just about two hours south west of London). This epic itinerary allowed us to visit two spots that have had on our “bucket list” for some time. A visit to the Hermitage Museum was so impressive. It was magical, historical, and truly epic to see these famous works of art. Most have not been seen outside of this museum. Exploring the wonders of St. Petersburg, Russia was a real treat. And on the back-end of our sojourn, to visit Stonehenge (just outside of Southampton) was equally impressive. It was a fabulous trip and we enjoyed exploring all of it with our good friends from Southern California.

So much of my research and writings revolve around food. I love to cook, have an instant affinity for a chef’s passion and early beginnings and I am rather intrigued by the inner-workings of a ship! How do the Harbor Pilot’s get on and off the ship? In what ports-of-call will the kitchen be picking up fresh provisions? How on earth do they serve so many people in this myriad of different venues morning, noon and night?

... continued on the blog 

We appreciate you taking the time to share IFWTWA's blog posts. 
If you'd like to be featured on the blog, please contact us.

  


Board Notes

By Linda Kissam

Desktop computer & cup of coffee & saucer on desk infront of window with view of lake

April Board Meeting cancelled.


Story Opportunities

By Debbra Dunning Brouillette

Woman writing in journal with laptop nearby

Outpost Magazine

Outpost Magazine covers a wide array of topics relating to travel, adventure and culture, using travel stories, insights and beautiful, high-resolution photos. They welcome stories of amazing travel experiences and insights within a 1500-word limit.

Ideas and stories can be pitched via email. Samples of previously published work may be required. Before pitching, reading some of the magazine’s feature articles to get a feel for style, focus, tone and subject matter.

Send story pitches to [email protected]

Payment rates for submissions negotiated on an individual basis. Canadian contributors paid through e-transfers; international contributors through PayPal exclusively.

For more information, go to this link:
https://outpostmagazine.com/contribute-to-outpost-magazine/


Dreamscapes Travel and Lifestyle Magazine

Dreamscapes is Canada’s premier travel and lifestyle magazine.

The annual editorial schedule is posted online at www.dreamscapes.ca/media_kit.php, see page 3. Proposals are accepted from freelance writers. To be considered for a specific issue, ideas should be submitted no less than 100 days prior to the issue “drop date” posted in the media kit. Otherwise, the proposal will simply be captured in the writer’s travel profile for consideration at a later date. The editor is now looking at article ideas for publication in 2020 due to a backlog of editorial commitments to be published in 2019.

Pay is 30 cents/word. Email Donna S. Vieira, Editor, to receive a PDF containing writer’s guidelines at [email protected]


Los Angeles Times Travel

The Travel section of the Los Angeles Times does not accept stories that result from sponsored or free trips, discounted or subsidized travel or media rates.
Website: http://www.latimes.com/travel/

Have a pitch? Contact: Catharine M. Hamm, Travel Editor: [email protected]
Writer’s Guidelines Link: http://www.latimes.com/la-trw-guidelines-story-story.html,
The L.A. Times does not accept stories that result from sponsored or free trips, discounted Payment varies for various sections. 


Travel + Leisure

Travel + Leisure has over six million readers. Freelance contributors write the majority of articles in the magazine so there are plenty of opportunities to pitch and be published. This interview with a former editor of Travel + Leisure may be helpful, even though it’s several years old: https://travelwriting2.com/from-the-editors-mouth-kate-appleton-of-travel-leisure/

If you have an idea for a story, send it to: [email protected]
Pay rates: $2/word for print; digital rates not shared publicly.


Association Recognitions

Closeup of partners clapping hands

It’s an honor to introduce you to our new members and to give recognition to members having anniversaries this month. We thank our new and anniversary members for including IFWTWA on their pathway to success. Your choice to work hard, think positive, network, and use your member benefits brings you to a whole new level of achievement. Way to go! 

ANNIVERSARIES
 

10 years
Linda Kissam
Food Wine Travel Chix
Arizona

10 years
Melanie Votaw
Trip Out on Travel
California

* * * * *

NEW MEMBERS

Shannon dal Pozzal
Shannon Travels the World
Louisiana

Kristi Dosh
Kristi Dosh
Florida

Belinda Diana Woodhouse
The Travel Bag
San Miguel de Cozumel
Mexico

Associate
Carol Yelverton
Hungry 4 Travel
Massachusetts
 


FWTWA Resources: Ways to Connect with Experts and Members

Friends toasting with wine glasses

Connect with fellow IFWTWA experts. Join Forums & create Social Circles on IFWTWA's website. Meet members in our private Facebook Members Group. Keep up-to-date and connect for retweets, "like" member's posts and follow each other, attend events and volunteer to work with the board of directors and committees. Interact with your colleagues to enhance and grow your professional goals.  

IFWTWA Website

IFWTWA Members Facebook Group
Important and timely information posted daily
Job leads | media trips | social media help | writing opportunities 
Weekly social media share threads

Follow | Connect | Retweet

Official Magazine of IFWTWA

 

Follow | Connect | Retweet

 

LOVE TO PLAN EVENTS?
Become a Regional Membership Coordinator 
Organize networking & local press trips & events

MEET  YOUR COLLEAGUES
Media & Press Trips
Annual Conferences
Volunteer!

Chris Cutler
Editor, PRESS PASS


IFWTWA | Murrieta, CA | 877-IFWTWA-9


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